THE ABDULLAH BIN HAMAD AL-ATTIYAH INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR ENERGY & SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Webinars


December - 2021

2022 Global Energy Landscape: Will the Crises Continue?

Webinar Context: The global energy crisis that the planet is currently facing has shown how dependent the world is on fossil fuels. Oil and natural gas prices recently soared to the highest levels in years, pushing up electricity bills as widespread energy shortages hit Asia and Europe. The crisis raises questions about whether the world is ready for the green energy revolution when it is currently struggling to power itself. On the other hand, the crisis shows the need to move further away from coal, gas, and oil as prices for those commodities spike. That said, renewables are not expanding quickly enough to satisfy the rebound in global electricity demand, which is set to grow by 4% in 2022, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). Renewables are expected to cover only half the projected increase in global electricity demand. The rest of the demand will be covered mostly by fossil fuel-based generation. As we approach the end of the year, this webinar brought together international sustainability and energy experts to discuss the possible pathways for 2022 and how the world can accelerate the shift to a sustainable trajectory in light of IEA’s alarming predictions.




August - 2021

Achieving Net Zero With Hydrogen

This webinar explores how hydrogen could accelerate the world’s journey toward net-zero carbon emissions and the obstacles that must be overcome for it to replace fossil fuels in “hard-to-abate” sectors such as transportation, power aluminium, concrete and steelmaking (which all require high-temperature process heat).




August - 2021

Can COP26 Live Up to the World's Expectations?

The world’s watchful gaze will be fixed on Glasgow at the beginning of November 2021, as global leaders and important industry figures convene for the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26). Expectations are running high, with hopes that the two-week climate conference will call on all nations to end the use of polluting vehicles, decarbonise the energy system, abandon coal power, and stop deforestation – all in the pursuit of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

 




May - 2021

Embracing Change - The Future of the Energy Industry

In 2020, global electricity demand fell by 5%, the largest drop since the 1930 global economic crisis, according to the IEA. Furthermore, all fuels saw a decline, except for renewable energy, which grew by 1% last year. Oil demand had seen some recovery in 2020, but the rebound slowed considerably in November, and slipped in December as renewed lockdowns and rising infection rates, due to the global pandemic, hit consumption. The IEA subsequently slashed its oil demand outlook for 2021 by 300,000 barrels per day (bpd) to 5.5 million bpd. While it is difficult to predict the direction of oil prices due to the uncertainty of demand, experts suggest a recovery could be underway at the beginning of 2022, given that vaccinations continue to be rolled out successfully worldwide.




December - 2020

Achieving Water Security in a Changing World

While substantial progress has been made in globally increasing access to clean drinking water and sanitation, billions of people, mostly in rural areas, still lack these basic services. Worldwide, 3 in 10 people lack access to safely managed drinking water services, 6 in 10 people lack access to safely managed sanitation facilities, 2 out of 5 people do not have a basic hand-washing facility with soap and water, and more than 892 million people still practice open defecation.




December - 2020

Al-Attiyah Foundation & The Financial Times Webinar - The Global Energy Outlook

As the world looks forward to 2021, Covid-19 and its continuing impact on energy demand will likely remain the background against which other significant events will unfold. Yet, by any measure, 2021 will be a significant year for the industry. Policy changes arising from the COP-26 meeting in November, the potentially game-changing transformation of energy in the US post the November 2020 election, and the launch of the 14th Five-Year Plan in China will all have repercussions, adding to the uncertainties the sector is already facing.




December - 2020

LNG Market - The Road to Recovery

The Al Attiyah Foundation in partnership with Refinitiv is hosting a webinar on ‘LNG Market:The Road to Recovery’ on 4th November 2020 at 12 PM (Qatar time). The Al-Attiyah Foundation is an independent think tank aiming to provide robust and practical knowledge and insights on global energy and sustainable development topics and communicate these for the benefit of the Foundation’s Members and community.




December - 2020

Al-Attiyah Foundation & The Financial Times Webinar - The Global Energy Outlook

As the world looks forward to 2021, Covid-19 and its continuing impact on energy demand will likely remain the background against which other significant events will unfold. Yet, by any measure, 2021 will be a significant year for the industry. Policy changes arising from the COP-26 meeting in November, the potentially game-changing transformation of energy in the US post the November 2020 election, and the launch of the 14th Five-Year Plan in China will all have repercussions, adding to the uncertainties the sector is already facing.




November - 2020

Webinar: LNG Market - The Road to Recovery

The Al Attiyah Foundation in partnership with Refinitiv is hosting a webinar on ‘LNG Market:The Road to Recovery’ on 4th November 2020 at 12 PM (Qatar time). The Al-Attiyah Foundation is an independent think tank aiming to provide robust and practical knowledge and insights on global energy and sustainable development topics and communicate these for the benefit of the Foundation’s Members and community.




September - 2020

Webinar: Harnessing Green Hydrogen for Secure & Affordable Energy

hydrogen are produced annually worldwide for various applications, including oil refining, ammonia and methanol production, metal processing, food processing, transportation, and power generation. Most of this hydrogen -around 95%- is produced from fossil fuels by steam methane reforming (SMR) of natural gas (the cheapest and most common method), as well as by partial oxidation of methane, and coal gasification.




August - 2020

Webinar: The Role of Sustainable Energy in Economic Recovery Packages

This is the fourth session of our Energy Webinar Series looking at the role that sustainable energy can, should and will play in national and regional economic stimulus plans, and why it is more pertinent to economic planning than before.

Governments worldwide plan to inject huge amounts of money into their economies as they seek to bounce back from lockdown.




July - 2020

Webinar: LNG: Short-Term Pain, Long-Term Gain?

The LNG market was already oversupplied before the arrival of the coronavirus pandemic, a trend that has triggered low prices and led to supply-contract cancellations and cargo deferments by importing countries. But despite the current headwinds being faced by the LNG industry, there are good reasons to be optimistic about a brighter future.




June - 2020

Webinar: Will Global Transport Fuel Take The Biggest Hit Post Covid-19?

Transportation accounts for about 25% of world energy demand and for around 60% of all the oil used each year. Road transport and aviation were especially strong sources of fuel demand growth in recent years, accounting for 85% and 8% of the energy consumed by transportation, respectively. With most vehicles staying off the road during the coronavirus lockdown, and with the suspension of international flights and maritime travel, the energy sector will have to cope with a drastically reduced demand for transport fuel. This falling demand, along with the lack of oil-storage options, has pushed the price of worldwide benchmark Brent crude below $20 in April.




May - 2020

Webinar: The Future of Crude Oil

The COVID-19 pandemic has globally affected many industries and in particular the oil and gas industry. Refined products are largely oversupplied, and refiners are scrambling to store gasoline and jet fuel at sea, but tanker rates are increasing, and available storage is dwindling. With no place left to go, refiners are reducing output and in danger of shutting down. As onshore storage fills up, demand for floating storage is booming, with traders and producers stashing oil to deliver at a later date for a higher price.